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All CRTC / Regulation Articles

Nov 13, 2014 — News Article

Why Canadian television is super comfortable with swearing by Lauren Strapagiel

Though the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission does accept complaints of indecent programming, the self-governing Canadian Broadcast Standards Council (CBSC) is the first line of defence.

Oct 28, 2014 — News Article

FCC Chairman Wants to Redefine Internet Video to Compete with Cable, Satellite Services by Ted Johnson

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler says that he is proposing that the definition of a multichannel programming provider be extended to the fast-expanding market for Internet video, a move he said would boost competition with cable and satellite services.

Oct 16, 2014 — News Article

CRTC releases full edition of the 2014 Communications Monitoring Report

The CRTC releases the full edition of the 2014 Communications Monitoring Report, which shows that Canadian families spend over $190 each month on communications services.

Oct 14, 2014 — News Article

Editorial: Let my Netflix go

Editorial says the regulatory side of the CRTC which deigns to command Canadian content and other quota-type approaches is hopelessly outdated.

Oct 11, 2014 — News Article

RTC orders Punjabi radio stations in Metro Vancouver to explain themselves by Peter O’Neil

Sher-E-Punjab, Radio Punjab Ltd. and Radio India (2003) have operated for years from studios in Metro but haven’t got Canadian broadcast licences and broadcast their signals from south of the border.

Oct 8, 2014 — News Article

U.S. Broadcasters May Leave Canadian Airwaves, And Some Say That's Fine by Daniel Tencer

Columnist says U.S. broadcasters are so concerned by the possibility Canada will switch to a pick-and-pay system for cable TV channels that several of them have threatened to pull themselves off Canadian airwaves altogether.

Oct 8, 2014 — News Article

Fraser Institute Essay Says More Regulation is Not the Answer

Fraser Institute Senior Fellow says that with the rising popularity of Netflix and other online broadcasters, Canada needs to readjust what was already a fundamentally flawed attitude towards broadcasting.

Oct 8, 2014 — News Article

Netflix-CRTC standoff is chance to open Canadian TV system, finds Fraser Institute report

A new Fraser Institute paper suggests that the recent stand-off between Netflix and the CRTC provides an opportunity for the government to dismantle barriers that prevent open competition in Canadian television broadcasting.

Oct 7, 2014 — News Article

Viacom threatens to pull channels from Canadian TV over pick-and-pay by James Bradshaw

American media giant Viacom Inc. is threatening to move its television stations off the dial and onto an online streaming service if the federal broadcast regulator forces cable and satellite companies to offer channels on a “pick-and-pay” basis.

Oct 3, 2014 — Policy Brief

Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2014-190, CRTC Let’s Talk TV Proceeding - Final Submission

Final comments on the CRTC's Let’s Talk TV hearings on the future of television in Canada.

Oct 3, 2014 — News Article

Big Fights For Sports TV Audiences by Isme Bennie

The CRTC says Canadian subscribers have been expressing their dissatisfaction with the price of sports channels and about paying for packages of channels that include those they do not want.

Oct 3, 2014 — News Article

CRTC shown to be irrelevant dinosaur

Author says that unless the CRTC plans to screen material from YouTube, iTunes, satellite radio, streaming online radio and on-demand movies and TV shows, and illegal online sources for adequate amounts of Canadian content, it has no business dictating to Netflix.

Oct 1, 2014 — News Article

Take your grubby hands off my Netflix by Chris Marchand

Editorial says Canadian content rules made sense on cable television where programming is set by networks and viewers were railroaded into watching, but they don’t make sense in a medium where viewers have the power to watch practically anything they want at their leisure.

Sep 30, 2014 — News Article

CRTC hits delete button on Netflix and Google submissions to TV hearings by Terry Pedwell

The CRTC wrote to the companies, saying it will remove presentations made by the two companies from the public record.

Sep 30, 2014 — Blog Post

Letter to the editor: Re” Thinking outside the idiot box” (September 27)

FRIENDS spokesperson, Ian Morrison, responds to a Globe and Mail editorial claiming that the CRTC needs to start thinking outside the "idiot box" if it wants to play a meaningful role in Canadians’ lives.

Sep 27, 2014 — News Article

How the CRTC is interfering with its own mandate in its Netflix battle by Calum Marsh

Columnist says the benefits of video-on-demand are of particular value to the Canadians who need the help most — independent filmmakers who can’t afford large-scale home video releases or nationwide theatrical distribution.

Sep 27, 2014 — News Article

Pick and pay not the best choice for TV viewers by Lawson Hunter, Edward Iacobucci and Michael Trebilcock

Columnist says regulating pick-and-pay or product offerings would launch the CRTC on a more interventionist role in the entire content and video distribution business.

Sep 25, 2014 — News Article

It’s over, CRTC. Netflix and globalization have won by John Ibbitson

Columnist says Canadian cultural industries will have to compete in the marketplace and it’s simply a question of when the last protections will be dismantled.

Sep 24, 2014 — News Article

Interference by PMO emboldened Netflix against broadcast regulator, experts say by Terry Pedwell

New media expert Michael Geist says Netflix's refusal to hand over requested consumer data to the CRTC calls into question the very authority of the broadcast regulator to institute any rules governing Internet-based video service providers.

Sep 24, 2014 — News Article

Regulation isn’t enough. The CRTC must create its own in-house TV production company by Jonathan Kay

Columnist says that thanks to monthly-subscription streaming services such as Netflix, consumers are able to pay money to watch shows they actually want to see as opposed to the shows that the CRTC thinks they should be watching.