• DALTON CAMP AWARD
  • NANOS RESEARC
  • Free the CBC
  • About Friends

Media Monitor

The Media Monitor is Canada's leading database for news stories on the broadcasting system, media ownership and cultural policies.

Search the Media Monitor:

Search

RSS Feed

Oct 22, 2014 — MotherJones

Canada's Coverage of the Ottawa Shootings Put American Cable News to Shame by James West

Columnist says the CBC gave a master class in calm, credible breaking news reporting during the attack on Parliament Hill.

Oct 20, 2014 — Hollywood Reporter

Netflix Orders First Canadian Original Series (Exclusive) by Etan Vlessing

The homegrown drama will debut simultaneously on City, the Canadian TV network that developed the one-hour drama, and in all Netflix territories outside Canada.

Oct 16, 2014 — Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission

CRTC releases full edition of the 2014 Communications Monitoring Report

The CRTC releases the full edition of the 2014 Communications Monitoring Report, which shows that Canadian families spend over $190 each month on communications services.

Oct 13, 2014 — National Post

Rogers’ first NHL weekend: Don Cherry in his glory; CBC’s misstep magnified by Scott Stinson

Columnist says Rogers needs the ability to piggyback on CBC’s widely distributed network if it wants to reach the most homes; without the public broadcaster on board it would have moved much of its Saturday night NHL lineup into the nether regions of premium cable.

Oct 9, 2014 — LaPresse.ca

Au royaume des aveugles by Joël Martel

Joël Martel asks how it is possible that someone has decided to condemn Radio-Canada to a slow and awful death without a massive public outcry.

Oct 8, 2014 — Globe & Mail

Ottawa seeks use of news footage without permission in political ads by Steven Chase

The Harper government is preparing to alter copyright law in Canada so politicians can use news footage and other journalistic content for attack ads and campaign spots without asking broadcasters or publishers for permission.

Oct 8, 2014 — Huffington Post Canada

U.S. Broadcasters May Leave Canadian Airwaves, And Some Say That's Fine by Daniel Tencer

Columnist says U.S. broadcasters are so concerned by the possibility Canada will switch to a pick-and-pay system for cable TV channels that several of them have threatened to pull themselves off Canadian airwaves altogether.

Oct 8, 2014 — Bro

Fraser Institute Essay Says More Regulation is Not the Answer

Fraser Institute Senior Fellow says that with the rising popularity of Netflix and other online broadcasters, Canada needs to readjust what was already a fundamentally flawed attitude towards broadcasting.

Oct 8, 2014 — National Post

Netflix-CRTC standoff is chance to open Canadian TV system, finds Fraser Institute report

A new Fraser Institute paper suggests that the recent stand-off between Netflix and the CRTC provides an opportunity for the government to dismantle barriers that prevent open competition in Canadian television broadcasting.

Oct 8, 2014 — The Tyee

Don't Give Postmedia More Local Monopolies by Marc Edge

Columnist says that the Competition Bureau should actually promote competition.

Oct 7, 2014 — Globe & Mail

Viacom threatens to pull channels from Canadian TV over pick-and-pay by James Bradshaw

American media giant Viacom Inc. is threatening to move its television stations off the dial and onto an online streaming service if the federal broadcast regulator forces cable and satellite companies to offer channels on a “pick-and-pay” basis.

Oct 3, 2014 — Video Age International

Big Fights For Sports TV Audiences by Isme Bennie

The CRTC says Canadian subscribers have been expressing their dissatisfaction with the price of sports channels and about paying for packages of channels that include those they do not want.

Oct 3, 2014 — Hamilton Spectator

CRTC shown to be irrelevant dinosaur

Author says that unless the CRTC plans to screen material from YouTube, iTunes, satellite radio, streaming online radio and on-demand movies and TV shows, and illegal online sources for adequate amounts of Canadian content, it has no business dictating to Netflix.

Oct 1, 2014 — The Dryden Observer

Take your grubby hands off my Netflix by Chris Marchand

Editorial says Canadian content rules made sense on cable television where programming is set by networks and viewers were railroaded into watching, but they don’t make sense in a medium where viewers have the power to watch practically anything they want at their leisure.

Sep 30, 2014 — Ottawa Star

CRTC hits delete button on Netflix and Google submissions to TV hearings by Terry Pedwell

The CRTC wrote to the companies, saying it will remove presentations made by the two companies from the public record.

Sep 28, 2014 — Ottawa Citizen

CBC releases details of employee compensation by Jordan Press

Four employees involved in CBC broadcasts earn more than $300,000 a year, taking home on average about $485,667 annually in total compensation. But the public broadcaster won’t identify who they are.

Sep 16, 2014 — Calgary Herald

TekSavvy could be looking into launching a cable service by Patrick O’Rourke

Columnist says that during the CRTC’s latest “Let’s Talk TV” discussions, third-party internet provider TekSavvy announced a new partnership with Hastings CableVision company, possibly signaling that the company has plans to move into providing cable services at some point in the future.

Sep 16, 2014 — The Tyee

Future of TV Hearing Turns into the Netflix Show by Michael Geist

Columnist asks if over the top services such as Netflix threaten Canadian content and whether it matters.

Sep 15, 2014 — OurWindsor.ca

Why over-the-air TV isn’t going away soon by Adam Mayers

One million Canadians get over-the-air television signals with an antenna and many are worried their free TV might soon be cut off.

Sep 15, 2014 — National Post

Disney warns regulations could threaten its place in Canadian television by Claire Brownell

Vice-president Susan Fox warns The Walt Disney Co. doesn’t want to pull out of Canadian television, but it will have to re-evaluate the business case for staying if regulations become too burdensome.